School of the Ozarks

 Lower School Primary Objectives

This document has been created as a precursor to a comprehensive curriculum guide for School of the Ozarks Lower School faculty, staff and community members.  While these basic student objectives are designed to provide the measureable benchmarks of knowledge and skills required for students to be promoted to subsequent grade levels, they are merely supplemental to the mission of education professed and upheld by School of the Ozarks: Molding citizens of Christ-like character who are hard-working, well-educated and patriotic. Completion of the curriculum is not the end; it is simply part of the means to prepare our students to be poured out upon the world for the cause of Christ.

 

 

Kindergarten

*Objectives bearing an asterisk following the skill stated are reinforced in grades K-6 during Memory Time each year.

Math:

Students will:

1.Recognize that God gave us numbers and systems of math to help us.

2.Correctly identify basic geometric shapes; e.g., triangle, square, circle, etc.

3.Properly form written numbers.

4.Correctly identify and sort numbers 0-10.

5.Count by ones, fives, and tens to 100.

6.Correctly count objects in a set and match sets and numbers.

7.Consistently and correctly count forward and backward.*

8.Correctly sort objects and identify the sorting rule used.

9.Copy and extend patterns.

10.Identify ordinal position

11.Create graphs using provided information.

12.Correctly recall the days of the week and the months of the year.

13.Explore and correctly use basic (1-10) addition and subtraction through repeated

      combinations of numbers.

14.Identify and state the values of a penny, a nickel, and a dime.

15.Manipulate objects to correctly represent addition and subtraction problems.

16.Identify the hour markings on a clock.

17.Identify geometric solids. (sphere, cube, cone)

18.Compare and measure length.

19.Cover designs using tangrams.

20.Copy geoboard designs.

Reading/Writing:

Students will:

1.Understand that God gave us language and the Bible.

2.Correctly identify upper and lower case letters of the alphabet.

3.Correctly identify consonants and vowels.

4.Correctly and consistently vocalize the most frequently used sound of each letter of the

    alphabet.

5.Demonstrate the ability to blend sounds together in short vowel words.

6.Correctly identify and vocalize short vowel sounds to decode words.

7.Use decoding skills to read beginning reading primers.

8.Recall specific, important details from stories and books read aloud by them or to them.

9.Share favorite books with others; either by reading them aloud or describing them.

10.Correctly form upper- and lower-case letters using D’Nealian handwriting.

Bible:

Students will:

1.Understand that God gave us the Bible as His only written Word.

2.Correctly identify the two parts of the Bible; Old and New Testaments. Recite how many

    books are in each, how many men wrote the Bible, and how many years between Old and

    New Testaments.*

3.Recite the books of the Old Testament in sequence.*

4.Correctly identify major characters in the Old Testament  and know for what they are

    most remembered.

5.Describe the major biblical figures discussed in class. (Old Testament: Adam and Eve,

    Cain and Abel, Noah, Shem, Ham, Japheth, Abraham, Sarah, Lot, Isaac, Ishmael,

    Jacob/Israel, Esau, Rueben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar, Zebulun, Dan, Naphtali, Gad,

    Asher, Benjamin, Joseph, Pharaoh, Moses, Aaron, Joshua, Caleb, Othniel, Ehud, Shamgar,

    Deborah, Gideon, Tolar, Jair, Jephthah, Ibzan, Elon Abdon, Samson, Abimilech, Eli, Samuel,

    Ruth, Naomi, Saul, Jonathan, David, Goliath, Mephibosheth, Solomon, Elija, Elisha, Daniel,

    Esther, Job)*

6.Consistently participate in daily praying.

7.Describe the basic Gospel, what sin is, what obedience is, God's love and forgiveness,

    God's creative and sustaining power, God’s holiness, and unchanging character.*

History/Geography

 

Students will:

1.  Begin to understand God’s sovereignty in history.

2.  Begin to understand that it is God’s providential acts that bring about the events of

      history.

3.  Begin to understand a timeline of history based on Biblical figures and American

       historical figures.*

4.  Explain in their own words that God is sovereign in their lives, in their families, and in

       the world.  (Drawn from scriptural stories and readings through the year.)

5.  Recall important people and events from School of the Ozarks history.*

6.  Identify the location of the school on maps of the campus and city.*

7.  Identify the major land features and uses of land in this area.*

8.  Recall basic facts of Taney County history.*

9.  Recognize basic traffic signs.*

10.Recall that their state is Missouri, and be able to identify the state on a map.*

Science:

The students will:

1. Recognize and describe attributes of God’s world around them.*

2. Recognize that all organisms, processes, laws, and elements found in scientific study were put into place by God.*

3. Observe and compare properties of objects.*

4. Identify and describe certain insects made by God (i.e. ants and ladybugs)*

5. Identify the 5 senses and describe the attributes of each.*

Art:

Students will:

1. Correctly identify primary colors on a color wheel.

2. Correctly spell color words.

3. Sort items into groups based on color.

Music:(Taught in Cantabile)

Students will:

1. Express that music is given by God and should be done to His glory.

2. Discriminate between high and low.

3. Identify pitch direction.

4. Match pitches in vocal range.

5. Identify and echo clear, focused head-tones.

6. Recognize steady beat or no beat.

7. Identify repeated rhythm patterns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Grade

*Objectives bearing an asterisk following the skill stated are reinforced in grades K-6 during Memory Time each year.

 

Math:

Students will:

1.    State that God gave us numbers and systems of math to help us.

2.    Explore new ways of manipulating materials, e.g., counting, sorting, comparing sizes

       and shapes, and making designs and patterns.

3.    Properly form written numbers.

4.    Consistently arrange items to form predictable patterns.

5.    Correctly organize items according to their distinctive properties or characteristics; i.e.,

       practice noticing small details and distinctions to aid in classifying.

6.    Consistently and correctly count forward and backward.

7.    Make correct comparisons between items according to length, quantity, weight,

       volume, and duration (more or less conception).

8.    After gaining adequate knowledge through practice, graph basic comparison

       information.

9.    Correctly identify basic geometric shapes; e.g., triangle, square, circle, etc.

10. Count by ones, twos, fives and tens to one hundred. (Grasp basic base ten system.)

11. Correctly recall the days of the week and the months of the year.

12. Explore and correctly use basic (1-20) addition and subtraction through repeated

       combinations of numbers.

13. Identify and state the values of a penny, a nickel, and a dime.

14. Identify the half-hour and hour markings on a clock.

15. Work independently to complete written and oral story problems.

16. Describe correctly fractions of 1/2, 1/3, and 1/4.

English/Grammar:

Students will:

1.   Demonstrate understanding that God gave us letters and language.  

2.   Consistently and properly form the upper and lower case versions of each letter of the

       alphabet (using modern manuscript).

3.   Memorize the Shurley Method jingles for the eight parts of speech (noun, verb, adverb,

      adjective, preposition, object of the preposition, pronoun, article adjectives) and the

      sentence jingle.

4.   Consistently use the Shurley Method question-answer flow for the parts of speech that

       have been covered.

5.   Accurately identify the complete subject/predicate in a sentence.

6.   Identify singular/plural words and common/proper nouns.

7.   Select synonyms and antonyms for given words.

8.   Recognize and use contractions; I’m, can’t, don’t, doesn’t, didn’t

9.   Identify simple sentences and fragments; make fragments into complete sentences.

10. Consistently and correctly write his or her name on all worksheets and papers.

11. Consistently use correct capitalization and punctuation in a written sentence (e.g.,

       beginning capitals, ending periods).

12. Imitate at least a three-sentence story with a beginning, middle, and an end, using the

       above skills correctly.

Latin:

1. Students will understand and recite that Latin language is a key that will unlock doors to

    truth, goodness and beauty found in language, vocabulary and biblical and historical

    writings.*

2. Students will learn Latin word meanings through songs, jingles, writing and speaking

    using Songschool Latin.

 

Reading/Handwriting:

Students will:

1. Recognize and use:

            a.  The beginning sounds of the alphabet

                        b.  The short vowel sounds

                        c.  The long vowel sounds

                        d.  Consonant digraphs

                        e.  “ing,” “ang” and “ong”

                        f.  Beginning consonant blends

            g.  The two sounds of “y”

                        h.  Vowel digraphs

                        i.  Broad “o”

                        j.  “sion” and “tion”

2. Read all decodable readers in the Saxon Phonics Program.

3. Read first grade selections of the First Favorites books.

4. Listen to or read all Literature Collection books.

5. Read books of choice from supplemental first grade literature list.

6. Successfully comprehend the details and the inferences in a given book.

7. Demonstrate noticeable improvement in the number of words understood and used

     correctly.

8. Consistently form upper- and lower-case letters from memory in modern manuscript.

Bible:

Students will:

1.   Understand that God gave us the Bible as His only written Word.

2.   Correctly identify the two parts of the Bible; Old and New Testaments.*

3.   Recite the books of the New Testament in sequence.*

4.   Understand that Jesus is God and was born of an earthly mother (i.e., He was God

       incarnate).

5.   Correctly identify major characters in the New Testament, and know for what they are

      most remembered.

6. Describe the major biblical events discussed in class. (Trinity/ New Testament Character

     Study)  Jesus, Mary, Joseph, John the Baptist, Zacharias, Elizabeth, Peter, Andrew, James,

     John, Phillip, Thomas, Matthew, Bartholomew, James the less, Simon, Thaddeus, Judas,

     Mary Magdalene, Martha, Lazarus, Pontius Pilate, Caiaphas , Paul, Barnabas, Timothy,

     Cornelius, The Philippian Jailer, and Nicodemus.*

7. Consistently participate in daily praying.

8. Describe in his or her own words: the basic Gospel, what sin is, what obedience is, God's

     love and forgiveness, God's creative and sustaining power, God’s holiness, and

     unchanging character.*

History/Geography:

Students will:

1.   List the 32 events on the flashcards for Old Testament Ancient Egypt series with

       applicable dates, and Scripture references in chronological order.*

2.   Recite the reasons given for the importance of significant dates or events covered in the

       study of Old Testament Ancient Egypt.

3.   Recall several basic facts related to each event studied.

4.   Explain the relationship between the Hebrews and the Egyptians.

5.   Locate on a map of the world the key places where historical events studied occurred.*

6.   Describe the basic life-styles of people during the major periods of Ancient history,

       including dress, technology, vocations, religious practices, education, housing, and

       entertainment.

7.   Further understand God’s sovereignty in history.

8.   Further understand that it is God’s providential acts that bring about the events of

       history.

9.   Have a basic understanding of map and globe skills. (Map Key, Legend, Latitude and

       Longitude, Compass Rose, Map Scale.)

10. Recite School of the Ozarks’ Five-fold mission, and discuss personal examples of each

       part of the mission.*

Science:

Students will:

1. Further understand the attributes of God’s world around them.

2. Further understand that that all organisms, processes, laws, and elements found in

     scientific study were put into place by God.

3. Explore and be able to label and define parts of plants, as well as explain the process of

     how plants retrieve energy from the sun to make their own food.

4. Describe how God made plants to reproduce their own kind, and how plants come from

     seeds.

5. Explore plant populations and graph data.

6. Define and describe air and the process of flight.*

7. Describe the habitat of a butterfly.

8. Explain how bees pollinate flowers, and describe bee metamorphosis and be enemies.    9. Describe life cycles and food chains of flying creatures.                                                              10. Explore flying animal populations and graph data.

Art:

Students will:

1. Describe the beauty, colors, textures, sizes, etc. in the Creation that God gave us.

2. Correctly hold, use, clean-up, and store all tools and materials.

3. Use the entire space given for creating work (i.e., fill the paper).

4. Recreate, both on paper and in sculpture, the basic geometric shapes.

5. Identify those geometric shapes in real objects.

6. Describe a given color or shade as light or dark.

7. Manipulate a variety of lights and darks (color & B/W) in drawing.

8. Copy from an illustration or photograph using above skills and tools.

9. Illustrate a story or theme using above skills and tools.

 

 

Music:

Students will:

1.   Express that music is given by God and should be done to His glory.

2.   Sing increasingly more difficult songs.

3.   Discriminate between high and low.

4.   Identify pitch direction.

5.   Echo and sing clear, focused head-tones (in vocal literature and songs).

6.   Match pitches in vocal range.

7.   Locate high and low sounds on pitched instruments.

8.   Recognize steady beat or no beat.

9.   Identify repeated rhythm patterns.

10. Distinguish between no beat, steady beat and melodic rhythm.

11. Discriminate between melody alone and melody with accompaniment.

11. Recognize and identify sections of music as same or different.

12. Create sound patterns with the body, voice or with instruments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second Grade

*Objectives bearing an asterisk following the skill stated are reinforced in grades K-6 during Memory Time each year.

Math:

Students will:

1.   Demonstrate understanding that God gave us numbers and mathematical systems to

       help us in life and to also help us understand His immutable (unchangeable) and logical  

       character.

2.   Complete each assigned math work/worksheets satisfactorily (75%+).

3.   Demonstrate ability to use number line concepts (numbers before and after) and count

       to 400 by ones and 1,000 by hundreds.

4.   Work independently to complete written and oral story problems after identifying

      correct functions to use.

5.   Correctly count by 2's, 3's, 4's, 5's, 10's, and 25's.

6.   Skip count in order to count money. Recognize and count denominations.

7.   Correctly add and subtract two digit numbers, with 70% accuracy.

8.   Describe and use fractions 1/2, 1/4, and 1/8 correctly; including comparing sizes of

       fractions.

9.   Correctly tell time in five minute intervals with 90% accuracy.

10. Comprehend the concept of multiplication and multiply 0 to 5 sums.

11. Correctly identify and use 1/2" markings on a ruler or yardstick.

12. Comprehend and decode simple graphs and scales with 70% accuracy.

 

 

English/Grammar:

Students will:

1.   Understand why we should seek to speak and write clearly.

2.   Comprehend a basic sentence structure and recognize the use of sentences and

       Paragraphs in God's Word and other literature.

3.   Memorize the Shurley Method jingles for subject pronoun and possessive pronoun.

4.   Demonstrate a consistent, correct use of nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions,

       object of the preposition, subject pronouns, and possessive pronouns; and identify

       them in simple sentences using the Shurley Method question-answer flow.

5.   Identify noun jobs:  SN, OP

6.   Identify the simple subject/predicate in a sentence.

7.   Demonstrate clear and correct understanding of past, present, and future tenses of

       simple verbs and regular/irregular verbs in written and oral work.

8.   Consistently demonstrate the correct subject/verb agreement in a sentence.

9.   Select and use a/an correctly.

10. Regularly present information orally, using complete sentences, e.g., in regularly

       scheduled oral presentations.

11. Properly use a comma between series of words, in addresses, dates, etc.

12. Imitate a writing piece with a beginning, middle, and an end, using the above skills

       correctly.

13. Demonstrate consistent neatness standards in writing assignments and other work.

14. Demonstrate proper use of a dictionary and thesaurus.

15. Properly identify the parts of a book.

 

Linguistics:

Students will:

1. Recite sounds of all 26 letters using Johnny Can Spell.

2. Practice spelling words with short vowels, consonant blends and digraphs correctly 80

     percent of the time.

3. Correctly spell words using the following basic phonics components and rules:

             a. short vowels and final double consonants

             b. short vowels and final ck and k

             c. short vowels and final nch and tch

             d. long a: a_e. ai, and ay

             e. long i: i_e, igh, and y

             f. long o: o_e, oa, and ow

             g. long u:u_e or oo, plurals with s

             h. r-influenced vowels: are, ire, ore, ure

             i. soft c (ce) and soft g (ge): open syllables with e and o

             j. /oi/ spelled oi or oy; compound words

             k. suffix es

             l. suffixes ed and ing: doubling rule

             m. suffixes ed and ing: drop final e

             n. long i and long o

             o. contractions with am, not, and will

             p. two like consonants with final er and y, plus le

             q. o spelled al, aw, or o

             r. long e and long I spelled y- change y to I and add es

             s. suffixes er and est

             t. oo spelled oo

             u. unlike consonants with final le

             v. silent consonants kn, mb, and wr

             w. homophones

4. Understand a compound word.

5. Correctly spell the days of the week, and months of the year.

5. Accurately spell his or her complete name (first, middle and last).

6. Begin to integrate linguistics with other subjects.

Latin:

Students will:

1. Recite that Latin language is a key that will unlock doors to truth, goodness and beauty found in language, vocabulary and past writings.

2.Practice correct Latin word meanings through songs, jingles, writing and speaking using the Songschool Latin Series.

Reading/Literature:

The students will:

1.   Demonstrate adequate knowledge and use of phonic fundamentals and decoding skills

       during everyday reading.

2.   Demonstrate an adequate improvement in his or her reading skills through the level of

       comprehension apparent in normal reading through written and oral comprehension

       exercises.

3.   Apply a satisfactory number of new vocabulary words from literature sets.

4.   Gain understanding of the meaning of new words through the application of contextual

       clues, derivation of words found (and known) with Latin roots and frequent use of the

       dictionary.

5.   Correctly comprehend the literal and inferential meaning in a written work through

       group discussions and practicing contextual study.

6.   Recall the qualities of the characters in stories and recognize those that are worth

       admiring, e.g., God-fearing, generous, kind, etc.

7.   Recognize and identify genres, e.g., fantasy, fiction, mystery, non-fiction, poetry, by the

       style and pictures in the literature.

8.   Show where to find the author, title, publisher, title page, content page, and dedication

       page in a book.

9.   Regularly participate in a schedule of oral reading and silent reading of literature.

10. Demonstrate a love of reading that manifests itself by showing interest in and ability to

       comprehend and enjoy books with increasing levels of difficulty and complexity.

 

Bible:

Students will:

1. Locate the biblical events studied in their Bibles.

2. Recite the major events of Genesis–Joshua with applicable dates, and Scripture

     references in chronological order.*

3. Understand  the reasons given for the importance of significant dates or events covered

     in the study of Genesis–Joshua.

4. Recall several basic facts related to each event studied.

5. Locate key places where biblical events occurred on a world map.

6. Understand (on a second grade level) the events studied by reading them in Scripture.

7. Recite from memory the [abbreviated] Ten Commandments.*

8. Articulate the fact that God has sovereignly led through all of Scripture.

 

History/Geography:

Students will:

1.   Further understand God’s sovereignty in history.

2.   Further understand that it is God’s providential acts that bring about the events of

       history.

3.   List timeline events using Story of the World for the Middle Ages, Renaissance &

      Reformation with applicable dates in chronological order.

4.   Recall several basic facts related to each event studied.

5.   Recite a simplistic version of church history- timeline information.*

6.   Locate on a map of the world the key places where historical events studied occurred.

7.   Begin to describe the basic life-styles of people during this period of history, including

      dress, technology, vocations, religious practices, education, housing, and entertainment.

8.   Use an understanding of map and globe skills to solve problems. (Map Key, Legend,

       Latitude and Longitude, Compass Rose, Map Scale.)

9.   Label all continents and oceans.

10. Discuss the history of the school and college, documenting important people and

       events, and describing examples of how God’s providence has guided, and continues to

       guide the school’s existence and development.*

11. Recite and explain each part of School of the Ozarks’ Five-fold mission.*

 

Science:

Students will:

1.   Further understand the attributes of God’s world around them.

2.   Further understand that that all organisms, processes, laws, and elements found in

       scientific study were put into place by God.

3.   Recognize and describe God’s water animals. (Day 5 of Creation)

4.   Understand aquatic animal food chains, and behaviors and life cycles of fish and snails.

5.   Explore aquatic animal populations and graph data.

6.   Recognize the properties and states of water.

7.   Demonstrate how to use a thermometer.

8.   Explain solubility, three forms of water, and the water cycle.

9.   Draw and label the water cycle to present an understanding of how it works.

10. Explain the properties of water and the water cycle.

11. Describe the properties and composition of ocean water.

12. Observe the properties and states of water and what causes objects to sink or float.

 

Art:

Students will:

1.   Describe the beauty, colors, textures, sizes, etc. found in the Creation that God gave to

       us.

2.   Correctly hold, use, clean-up, and store all tools and materials.

3.   Use the entire space given for creating work (i.e., fill the paper).

4.   Use basic geometric shapes to assist in recreating, both on paper and in sculpture,

       copies of real objects.

5.   Identify and recreate similar proportions in observed objects.

6.   Manipulate a variety of lights and darks (color & B/W) in drawing.

7.   Correctly use overlapping and size to illustrate size and distance/depth in space.

8.   Copy from an illustration or photograph using above skills and tools.

9.   Illustrate a story or theme using above skills and tools.

10. Given theme, create own illustration/sculpture using above skills.

11. Integration with other subject areas (illustrate in Bible, history, literature, etc.)

 

 

Music:

Students will:

1.   Express that music is given by God and should be done to His glory.

2.   Sing increasingly more difficult songs including songs in Latin and Psalms.

3.   Discriminate between high and low.

4.   Identify pitch direction.

5.   Match pitches in vocal range.

6.   Locate high and low sounds on pitched instruments.

7.   Recognize steady beat or no beat.

8.   Identify repeated rhythm patterns.

9.   Distinguish between no beat, steady beat and melodic rhythm.

10. Discriminate between melody alone and melody with accompaniment.

11. Recognize and identify sections of music as same or different.

12. Identify melodic direction as up, down or repeat.

13. Respond to accents and changing meters.

14. Determine if music moves in twos or threes.

15. Perceive differences in even and uneven, long and short rhythmic duration.

16. Sing in tune, using clear free tone and correct breath support, alone or with others.

17. Demonstrate pulse and pitch direction of music with locomotor and non-locomotor

       movements.

18. Recognize and create symbols to notate musical sounds.

19. Create sound patterns with the body, voice or with instruments.

20. Describe musical selections.

21. Use listening skills to describe the elements of music.

22. Identify the style of music of the period being studied in history through exposure to it.

       Second graders study American history up to the 19th century in chronological order.

23. Increasingly identify and appreciate timeless pieces of music and their composers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Third Grade

*Objectives bearing an asterisk following the skill stated are reinforced in grades K-6 during Memory Time each year.

Math:

Students will:

1.   In an increasing way demonstrate understanding that God gave us numbers and

       mathematical systems to help us in life and to also help us understand His immutable

      (unchangeable) and logical character.

2.   Complete each assigned math work/worksheets satisfactorily (75%+).

3.   Promptly and correctly, with at least 75% accuracy, mentally solve math problems

       using 0 -12 with +, -, x.

4.   Begin to solve basic division problems.

5.   Complete written story problems (using time, temperature, calendar, etc.) involving 3

       or 4 steps.

6.   Solve beginning-level algebra and geometry problems.

7.   Use math skills to correctly recognize and use money.

8.   Apply math skills to other subject areas (e.g., Bible, history, etc.) as can naturally occur.

9.   Correctly tell time to the minute with 90% accuracy.

10. Design, comprehend, and decode simple graphs and scales with 75% accuracy.

 

 

 

English/Grammar:

The students will:

1.   Consistently and properly form the upper and lower case versions of each letter of the

       alphabet in cursive.

2.   Demonstrate a consistent, correct use of adverbs and direct objects and identify them in

       simple sentences.

3.   Recognize homonyms for given words.

4.   Recognize and write the possessive forms of nouns.

5.   Identify and use simple sentences with compound parts and compound sentences.

6.   Recognize and correct run-on sentences.

7.   Identify linking verbs, predicate nouns, and predicate adjectives.

8.   Make regular oral presentations of information, using complete sentences.

9.   Consistently and correctly write his or her name and date on all worksheets and papers.

10. Consistently use additional correct capitalization and punctuation (! , “” ? .) in a written

       sentence.

11. Correctly identify the difference between a subject and a predicate in a sentence.

12. Use the correct tense of helping verbs.

13. Imitate short stories, fables and poetry, and compose letters using the above skills

       correctly. (Illustrations may be included.) Edit own work.

14. Use basic research materials in addition to a thesaurus and dictionary.

15. Demonstrate how to find books in a library.

 

Latin:

Students will:

1. Practice recognizing Latin vocabulary found in Latin for Children Primer A by Larsen and

    Perrin.

2. Recite and write Latin noun declensions.

3. Recite and write first conjugation verbs.

 

Linguistics:

The students will:

1. Learn and apply the rules found in The Grammar of Spelling.

2. Accurately spell, alphabetize, and use all words included in the spelling lists found in The

    Grammar of Spelling.

3. Satisfactorily (75% or more) and consistently apply spelling rules in assigned work

    (including other disciplines).

 

Reading/Literature:

The students will:

1.   Demonstrate adequate knowledge and use of phonic fundamentals during day-to-day

       reading (including decoding skills).

2.   Demonstrate an adequate improvement in reading skills through the level of

       comprehension apparent in normal reading through written and oral comprehension  

       exercises.

3.   Apply a satisfactory number of new vocabulary words to written and oral presentations.

4.   Gain understanding of the meaning of new words through the application of contextual

       clues, derivation of words found (and known) with Latin roots and frequent use of the

       dictionary.

5.   Correctly comprehend the literal and inferential meaning in a written work through

       group discussions and practicing contextual study.

6.   Recall the qualities of the characters in stories and recognize those that are worth

       admiring, e.g., God-fearing, generous, kind, etc.

7.   Recognize and identify genres (e.g. fantasy, fiction, and historical fiction) by the style of

       the literature.

8.   Show where to find the author, title, publisher, title page, content page, and dedication  

       page in a book.

9.   Regularly participate in a schedule of oral reading and silent reading of literature.

10. Complete several kinds of oral presentations, e.g., drama, oral reading, etc., in front of

       the class, parent groups and other students as an audience.

11. Demonstrate a love of reading that manifests itself by showing interest in and ability to

       comprehend and enjoy books with increasing levels of difficulty and complexity.

 

 

 

Bible:

The students will:

1. Locate in his Bible the biblical events studied.

2. List the 32 events on the flashcards for Judges–Kings series with applicable dates, and

    Scripture references in chronological order.

3. Recite the reasons given for the importance of significant dates or events covered in the

     study of Judges–Kings and the study of the Old Testament prophets.

4. Recall several basic facts related to each event studied.

5. Locate on a map of the world the key places where biblical events studied occurred.

6. Understand (in a limited way) the events studied by reading them in Scripture.

7. Articulate the fact that God has sovereignly led through all of Scripture.

 

 

History/Geography:

The students will:

1.   Begin to understand the flow (that is, sequencing) of history including the following

       people and  events: Creation, Indians, The Separatists, America’s Indians, The Colonists,  

       Paul Revere, George Washington, European Settlers, Marquette and Joliet, the founding

       of St. Louis, Fur Traders, Lewis and Clark, and  Mark Twain

2.   Further understand God’s sovereignty in history.

3.   Further understand that it is God’s providential acts that bring about the events of

       history.

4.   List the Story of the World Events for the time period from Explorers to 1815 with

       applicable dates in chronological order.*

5.   Recall several basic facts related to each event studied.

6.   Explain the religious underpinnings and foundational matters surrounding the

       beginnings of America.*

7.   Locate on a map of the world the key places where historical events studied occurred.

8.   Describe the basic life-styles of people during this period of history, including dress,

       technology, vocations, religious practices, education, housing, and entertainment.

9,   Sequence Flash Cards (including prior years) in chronological order and describe each

       historic event represented.*

10. Describe the basic lifestyle of the Indians prior to the European settlers; their dress,

       food, shelters, celebrations, religion, language, and how they affect Missouri history.*

11. Recall names and basic details of first European settlers in Missouri.*

12. Describe how lifestyles (dress, jobs, entertainment, food) of people living in this area

       have changed over the period studied.

13. Identify the God-made resources of the area, such as unique soil, rivers, lakes,

       vegetation/crops, climate, etc.

14. Identify basic geographical features of the United States on a map. (Appalachian, Rocky,

       Sierra Nevada, and Cascade Mountain ranges, Great Basin, Missouri, Mississippi, Ohio, 

       and Rio Grande Rivers, Ozark Plateau, Coastal Plains, Great Plains, Great Lakes,

       Washington D.C.)

15. Identify major cities and geographical regions of Missouri. (St. Louis, Kansas City,

       Springfield, Branson, Pt. Lookout, student’s home town if different from above, Cape

       Girardeau, Ozark Highlands, Southeastern Lowlands, Osage Plains, Glaciated Till Plains,

       Alluvial River Plains)*

16. Recite leaders/ presidents of School/ College of the Ozarks.*

17. Identify character traits associated with people and events throughout the school’s

       history.

18. Continue practice of map skills using distance and scale, graphs, pictures, direction,

       symbols, boundaries and borders.

19. Famous Americans from 1600-1850: state basic facts about each person and how they

       each contributed to the development of America.*

20. Name the branches of government, the jobs of each branch, and the titles of those

        belonging to each branch at both state and local levels.*

21. Identify branches of local and state government.*

 

Science:

Students will:

1, Further understand the attributes of God’s world around them.

2. Further understand that that all organisms, processes, laws, and elements found in

    scientific study were put into place by God.

3. Explain the attributes and differences of land animal populations.

4. Define and describe properties of land animals, including size, color, shape, texture and

    weight.

5. Explore land animal populations and graph data.

6. Demonstrate how to use a thermometer.

7. Describe life cycles, food chains and food webs of land animals.

8. Observe and discuss ecosystems and habitats.

9. Build a pond ecosystem.

 

 

Art:

Students will:

1.   Describe the beauty, colors, textures, sizes, etc. found in the Creation that God gave to us.

2.   Correctly hold, use, clean-up, and store all tools and materials.

3.   Use the entire space given for creating work (i.e., fill the paper).

4.   Use basic geometric shapes to assist in recreating, both on paper and in sculpture, copies

      of real objects.

5.   Identify and recreate similar proportions in observed objects.

6.   Manipulate a variety of lights and darks (color & B/W) in drawing.

7.   Correctly use overlapping and size to illustrate size and distance/depth in space.

8.   Copy from an illustration or photograph using above skills and tools.

9.   Illustrate a story or theme using above skills and tools.

10. Given theme, create own illustration/sculpture using above skills.

11. Enjoy works of art concurrent with the historical period studied, paying particular   

       attention to the fundamental mechanical aspects of the work itself as well as to the

      meaning conveyed by the artist through a given work and the historical context of both

      the work and its creator, e.g., Embarkation of the Pilgrims, Robert W. Weir, 1843, John

     Singleton Copley, Paul Revere, c. 1768–70, Emanuel Leutze, Washington Crossing the

     Delaware, 1851, John Singer Sargent, The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit, 1882,

     American Gothic, Grant Wood, 1930,The Sources of Country Music, Thomas Hart Benton,

     1975, Frederick McCubbin, ThePioneer, 1904, Frederic Remington, The Scream of

     Shrapnel at San Juan Hill, 1898.

12. Integration with other subject areas (illustrate in Bible, history, literature, etc.)

 

 

Music:

Students will:

1.   Express that music is given by God and should be done to His glory.

2.   Sing increasingly more difficult songs including songs in Latin and Psalms.

3.   Identify and describe sounds and methods of changing sounds.

4.   Categorize sounds by method of sound reproduction.

5.   Identify and demonstrate pitch from musical notation.

6.   Perform melodic patterns (melodies) from notation.

7.   Identify steady beat in musical examples.

8.   Sing expressively a repertoire of familiar songs from varied styles, including rounds,

      partner-songs, and two-part-songs with or without accompaniment.

9.   Interpret basic notation symbols for rhythm and melodic contour.

10. Identify musical instruments or styles of the Ancient World .

11. Increasingly identify and appreciate timeless pieces of music and their composers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fourth Grade

*Objectives bearing an asterisk following the skill stated are reinforced in grades K-6 during Memory Time each year.

Math:

Students will:

1.   Increasingly demonstrate understanding that God gave us numbers and mathematical

       systems to help us in life and to also help us understand His immutable(unchangeable)

       and logical character.

2.   Complete all assigned math work/worksheets satisfactorily (75%+).

3.   Promptly and correctly, with at least 75% accuracy, mentally solve math problems

      using 0–12 with all four functions.

4.   Complete written story problems (using a variety of subjects) involving 3 or 4 steps.

5.   Solve beginning-level division, algebra, and geometry problems.

6.   Use math skills to correctly recognize and use money.

7.   Apply math skills to other subject areas (e.g., Bible, history, etc.) as can naturally occur.

8.   Correctly add and subtract simple fractions.

9.   Accurately describe and use standard and metric measurements.

10. Accurately estimate numbers to solve and check problems.

11. Recall all twelve months of the year.

 

English/Grammar:

Students will:

1.   Comprehend a basic sentence structure and recognize the use of sentences and

       paragraphs in verbal communication.

2.   Demonstrate a consistent, correct use of predicate nouns, conjunctions, interjections;

       identify them in complete sentences.

3.   Know and use helping verbs, NOT as an adverb, and the question verbs.

4.   Orally present information regularly, using complete sentences (e.g., in regularly

      scheduled oral presentations). (Bible, literature, and other materials should be used in a

      set schedule. Memorization and oral reading may be alternated.)

5.   Demonstrate correct use of grammar elements through proofing and editing his own

      and others' written work.

6.   Summarize narrative stories and write from pictures.

7.   Read and recite poetry.

8.   Learn the Shurley Grammar chants for helping verb, object pronoun, and subject and

      verb must agree.

9.   Demonstrate correct usage of Shurley grammar chants in his or her writing.

 

Linguistics:

Students will:

1. Learn and apply the following rules found in The Grammar of Spelling Grade 4:

2. Accurately spell, alphabetize, and use all words included in the spelling lists found in The

    Grammar of Spelling Grade 4

3. Satisfactorily (75% or more) and consistently apply spelling rules in assigned work

    (including other disciplines).

 

Latin:

Students will:

1. Practice recognizing Latin vocabulary found in Latin for Children Primer B by Larsen and

     Perrin.

2. Recite and write Latin noun declensions.

3. Recite and write first conjugation verbs.

 

Reading/Literature:

Students will:

1.   Demonstrate adequate knowledge and use of phonic fundamentals in day-to-day

       reading (including decoding skills).

2.   Demonstrate an adequate improvement in reading skills through the level of

      comprehension apparent in normal reading through written and oral comprehension

      exercises.

3.   Utilize new vocabulary words during written and oral presentations.

4.   Gain understanding of the meaning of new words through the application of contextual

       clues, derivation of words found (and known) with Latin roots and frequent use of the

       dictionary.

5.   Correctly comprehend the literal and inferential meaning in a written work through

       Group discussions and practicing contextual study.

6.   Demonstrate predictive skills through various activities, such as writing a brief sequel

       to the book or predicting what will happen in the next chapter after the written story.

7.   Answer comprehension questions over independent and group reading.  

8.   Recall the qualities of the characters in stories and recognize those that are worth

      admiring, e.g., God-fearing, generous, kind, etc.

9.   Recognize and identify genres, e.g., comedy, fantasy, fiction, legends, myths, mystery,

      non-fiction, poetry, by the style of the literature.

10. Show where to find the author, title, publisher, title page, content page, and dedication

       page in a book.

11. Regularly participate in a schedule of oral reading and silent reading of literature.

12. Complete several kinds of oral presentations, e.g., drama, oral reading, etc., in front of

       the class, parent groups and other students as an audience.

13. Demonstrate a love of reading that manifests itself by showing interest in and ability to

        comprehend and enjoy books with increasing levels of difficulty and complexity.

 

 

 

Bible:

Students will:

1. Locate in his Bible the biblical events studied.

2. List and describe major and minor Old Testament prophets.

3. List the 32 events on the flashcards for series with applicable dates, and Scripture

     references in chronological order.

4. Recite the reasons given for the importance of significant dates or events covered in the

     study of Chronicles–Malachi.

5. Recall several basic facts related to each event studied.

6. Locate on a map of the world the key places where biblical events studied occurred.

7. Understand the events studied by reading them in Scripture.

8. Articulate the fact that God has sovereignly led through all of Scripture.

 

 

History/Geography:

Students will:

1.   List the 32 events on the flashcards for 1815 to Present series with applicable dates in

       chronological order.*

2.   Recall several basic facts related to each event studied.

3.   Articulate the implications of significant events studied including the War Between the

       States, World War I, and World War II.

4.   Locate on a map of the world the key places where historical events studied occurred.

5.   Describe the basic life-styles of people during this period of history, including dress,

       technology, vocations, religious practices, education, housing, and entertainment.

6.   Sequence Flash Cards (including prior years) in chronological order and describe each

       historic event represented.*

7.   Review processes and vocabulary of local, state and national government, including the

       Preamble and the Bill of Rights.*

8.   Explore biographies of famous Americans: America’s Cowboys, Abraham Lincoln,

       Thomas Edison, Wilbur and Orville Wright, George Washington Carver, and Walt

       Disney.

9.   Describe how lifestyles (dress, jobs, entertainment, food) of people living in America

       have changed over the period studied.

10. Identify the God-made resources of America, such as unique soil, rivers, lakes,

       vegetation/crops, climate, etc.

11. Use an understanding of map and globe skills to solve problems. (Map Key, Legend,

       Latitude and Longitude, Compass Rose, Map Scale.)

12. Label all continents and oceans.*

13. Develop an appreciation of the beauty of God’s creation that is America.

14. Identify and define the three branches of American Government.*

15. Recite the (abbreviated) Bill of Rights.*

16. Recite the Preamble to the Constitution.*

 

 

Science:

Students will:

1.   Further understand the attributes of God’s world around them.

2.   Further understand that that all organisms, processes, laws, and elements found in

      scientific study were put into place by God.

3.   Explain how scale is relevant or in proportion to actual size and distance.

4.   Calculate the sizes of the planets, and their distances from the Earth.

5.   Describe how the solar system sets our days and years.

6.   Demonstrate how Earth revolves around the sun and spins on an axis, and how the

       moon is in orbit around the earth.

7.   Identify the relationship between the moon and the Earth.

8.   Explain why seasons occur.

9.   Define asteroids, meteorites and comets.

10. Define and provide examples of stars and constellations.

11. Name and describe each planet.

12. Describe the attributes that God gave the moon and how it affects our planets.

13. Define shadow, and be able to explain how a shadow is made, as well as what affects the

        length of shadows.

14. Keep a solar and lunar journal with observations and charts to reflect characteristics.

 

 

Art:

Students will:

1.   Describe the beauty, colors, textures, sizes, etc. found in the Creation that God gave to us.

2.   Correctly hold, use, clean-up, and store all tools and materials.

3.   Use the entire space given for creating work (i.e., fill the paper).

4.   Use basic geometric shapes to assist in recreating, both on paper and in sculpture,

       copies of real objects.

5.   Identify and recreate similar proportions in observed objects.

6.   Manipulate a variety of lights and darks (color & B/W) in drawing.

7.   Correctly use overlapping and size to illustrate size and distance/depth in space.

8.   Copy from an illustration or photograph using above skills and tools.

9.   Illustrate a story or theme using above skills and tools.

10. Given theme, create own illustration/sculpture using above skills.

11. Identify important artists and appreciate works of art concurrent with the historical

       period studied, paying particular attention to the fundamental mechanical aspects of

       the work itself as well as to the meaning conveyed by the artist through a given work

       and thehistorical context of both the work and its creator, e.g., baroque and rococo art,

       neoclassicism and the romantic movement (1st semester) as well as American art

       produced from 1815 to present day.(2nd semester)

12. Integration with other subject areas (illustrate in Bible, history, literature, etc.)

 

Music:

Students will:

1. Express that music is given by God and should be done to His glory.

2. Sing increasingly more difficult songs including songs in Latin and Psalms.

3. Identify and describe sounds and methods of changing sounds. (Students have a sound

    unit in science in fourth grade- this should bridge the gap between music and science

    curriculum.)

4. Categorize sounds by method of sound reproduction.

5. Identify and demonstrate pitch from musical notation.

6. Perform melodic patterns (melodies) from notation.

7. Identify steady beat in musical examples.

8. Sing expressively a repertoire of familiar songs from varied styles, including rounds,

    partner-songs, and two-part-songs with or without accompaniment.

9. Interpret basic notation symbols for rhythm and melodic contour.

10. Recognize relationship of accents to meter.

11. Identify chord changes, counter melodies, monody, homophony, and polyphony.

12. Identify introduction, interlude, cadence, and coda (simple forms AB, ABA, and Rondo).

13. Identify common musical terms related to tempo and dynamics.

14. Play an accompaniment.

15. Demonstrate elements of space, energy, and time through expressive movement.

16. Identify, by listening, a basic repertoire of standard instrument and vocal compositions.

17. Identify the style of music of the period being studied in history (Ancient Greece and

      Rome) through exposure to it.

18. Increasingly identify and appreciate timeless pieces of music and their composers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fifth Grade

*Objectives bearing an asterisk following the skill stated are reinforced in grades K-6 during Memory Time each year.

 

Math:

Students will:

1.   Increasingly demonstrate understanding that God gave us numbers and mathematical

       systems to help us in life and to also help us understand His immutable (unchangeable)

       and logical character.

2.   Complete all assigned math work/worksheets satisfactorily (75%+).

3.   Promptly and correctly solve math problems with 90% accuracy using numbers 0-12

      and all four functions.

4.   Complete written story problems (using a variety of subjects) involving 1-4 steps.

5.   Solve at least 75% of all given addition, subtraction, multiplication (3 digits), division

      (two digits) problems using whole numbers and decimal numbers.

6.   Use math skills to correctly solve money problems.

7.   Apply math skills to other subject areas (e.g., Bible, history, etc.) as can naturally occur.

8.   Correctly add and subtract fractions with identical and different denominations.

9.   Accurately describe and use standard and metric measurements.

10. Accurately estimate (round) numbers to solve and check problems.

11. Recall all twelve months of year and cardinal directions.

12. Correctly identify basic geometric figures and calculate perimeter/area of rectangles.

13. Correctly add and subtract mixed numbers.

 

 

English/Grammar:

Students will:

1. Recognize and consistently compose a complete sentence; identify and avoid sentence

     fragments.

2. Correctly parse/classify a simple sentence.

3. Recognize the adverb exception and inverted order.

4. Know and use indefinite pronouns.

5. Identify and write complex sentences with subordinate conjunctions.

6. Identify and use degrees of adjectives.

7. Demonstrate correct use of grammar elements through proofing and editing his own

    and others' written work and correct his own spelling and grammatical errors.

8. Take basic notes from a speaker's presentation.

9. Write several specific forms of poetry.

 

 

Linguistics:

Students will:

1. Learn and apply the rules found in The Grammar of Spelling Grade 5

2. Accurately spell, alphabetize, and use all words included in the spelling lists found in The

     Grammar of Spelling Grade 5

3. Satisfactorily (75% or more) and consistently apply spelling rules in assigned work

     (including other disciplines).

 

 

Latin:

Students will:

1. Practice recognizing Latin vocabulary found in Latin for Children Primer C by Larsen and

     Perrin.

2. Decline nouns

3. Conjugate verbs

4. Participate in minimal Latin conversation.

 

Reading/Literature:

Students will:

1.   Demonstrate an adequate improvement in reading skills at a fifth-grade level or above

       through written and oral comprehension exercises.

2.   Apply a satisfactory number of new vocabulary words to written and oral presentations.

3.   Gain understanding of the meaning of new words through the application of contextual

       clues, derivation of words found (and known) with Latin roots and frequent use of the

       dictionary.

4.   Correctly comprehend the literal and inferential meaning in a written work through

       group discussions and practicing contextual study.

5.   Evaluate characters and ideas in a limited way as to determine whether they are in line

       with basic biblical values and principles. This includes being able to determine whether

       a character is worthy of imitation by the student.

6.   Skim various readings with a fifth grade (or higher) level of comprehension.

7.   Identify the setting, characters, and basic plot of a given story or book.

8.   Demonstrate predictive skills through various activities, such as writing a brief sequel

       to the book or predicting what will happen in the next chapter/after the written story.

9.   Answer comprehension questions over independent and group reading. 

10. Recall the qualities of the characters in stories and recognize those that are worth

       admiring, e.g., God-fearing, generous, kind, etc.

11. Express a worthwhile opinion for liking or disliking a particular book.

12. Recognize and identify genres, e.g., comedy, drama, fantasy, fiction, legends, myths,

       mystery, non-fiction, poetry, by the style of the literature.

13. Find the ISBN in a book and know its purpose.

14. Regularly participate in a schedule of oral reading and silent reading of literature.

15. Complete several kinds of oral presentations, e.g., drama, oral reading, etc., in front of

       the class, parent groups and other students as an audience.

16. Demonstrate a love of reading that manifests itself by showing interest in and ability to

       comprehend and enjoy books with increasing levels of difficulty and complexity.

 

 

Bible:

Students will:

1. Locate in his Bible the biblical events studied.

2. List the 32 events on the Gospels flashcards for series with applicable dates, and

    Scripture references in chronological order.

3. Recite the reasons given for the importance of significant dates or events covered in the

    study of the Gospels.

4. Recall several basic facts related to each event studied.

5. Locate on a map of the world the key places where biblical events studied occurred.

6. Understand the events studied by reading them in Scripture.

7. Articulate the fact that God has sovereignly led through all of Scripture.

 

 

 

History/Geography:

Students will:

1.   List the 32 events on the flashcards for Old Testament Ancient Egypt and New

      Testament, Greece and Rone series with applicable dates, and Scripture references in

      chronological order.*

2.   Explain the reasons given for the importance of significant dates or events covered in

      the study of Old Testament Ancient Egypt, New Testament Greece and Rome.

3.   Recall several basic facts related to each event studied.

4.   Explain cause and effect relationships between events on the timeline from Creation to

      AD 400.

5.   Explain the relationship between the Hebrews and the Egyptians.

6.   Locate on a map of the world the key places where historical events studied occurred.

7.   Describe the basic life-styles of people during the major periods of Ancient history,

       including dress, technology, vocations, religious practices, education, housing, and

       entertainment.

8.   Further understand God’s sovereignty in history.

9.   Further understand that it is God’s providential acts that bring about the events of

       history.

10. Have a basic understanding of map and globe skills. (Map Key, Legend, Latitude and

       Longitude, Compass Rose, Map Scale.)

11. Recite School of the Ozarks’ Five-fold mission, and discuss personal examples of each

       part of the mission.*

12. Review processes and vocabulary of local, state and national government, including the

       Preamble and the Bill of Rights.*

 

 

Science:

Students will:

1. Further understand the attributes of God’s world around them.

2. Further understand that that all organisms, processes, laws, and elements found in

     scientific study were put into place by God.

3. Define and describe the parts of the eye and explain how those parts work together with

     the brain to enable sight.

4. Define, describe and compare bones, muscles, and tissues.

5. Describe the parts and functions of the heart, lungs, skin and teeth.

6. Define, describe, and compare fat, protein and carbohydrates.

7. Recognize components of human nutrition.

8. Recite all body systems and be able to explain the parts of each and how each one works.

9. Recognize the attributes of God in man’s physical body, the wonder of His creation, and

     the presence of His image.

 

 

Art:

Students will:

1.   Describe with good detail samples of variety in beauty, colors, textures, sizes, etc. found

       in the Creation that God gave to us.

2.   Correctly hold, use, clean-up, and store all tools and materials.

3.   Use the entire space given for creating work (i.e., fill the paper).

4.   Use one- and two-point perspective in observations and from imagination.

5.   Render an outdoor landscape using correct perspective.

6.   Manipulate a variety (five to seven) of lights and darks (values) in color & B/W

      drawings and paintings.

7.   Identify and draw details of faces and bodies using proper proportions.

8.   Construct line drawings using a variety of line widths, implied textures, and shading

      (values).

9.   Draw or paint a given mammal or bird with correct proportions and using the above

      skills.

10, Copy from an illustration or photograph using the above skills and tools.

11. Identify and correct an unbalanced drawing or painting (i.e., see how picture is

       constructed with shapes of negative and positive space).

12. Illustrate a story or theme using above skills and tools.

13. Given theme, create own illustration/sculpture using above skills.

14. Create and explain an etching.

15. Identify the fundamentals of aesthetic philosophy, paying particular attention to the

       definitions of the true, the good, and the beautiful.

16. Enjoy works of art concurrent with the historical period studied, paying particular

       attention to the fundamental mechanical aspects of the work itself as well as to the

       meaning conveyed by the artist through a given work and the historical context of both

       the work and its creator, e.g., Ancient Grecian art and Ancient Roman art.

17. Integration with other subject areas (illustrate in Bible, history, literature, etc.)

 

 

 

Music:

Students will:

1. Express that music is given by God and should be done to His glory.

2. Sing increasingly more difficult songs including songs in Latin and Psalms.

3. Identify and describe sounds and methods of changing sounds.

4. Categorize sounds by method of sound reproduction.

5. Identify and demonstrate pitch from musical notation.

6. Perform melodic patterns (melodies) from notation.

7. Identify steady beat in musical examples.

8. Sing expressively a repertoire of familiar songs from varied styles, including rounds,

    partner-songs, and two-part-songs with or without accompaniment.

9. Interpret basic notation symbols for rhythm and melodic contour.

10. Discriminate and identify major and pentatonic tonalities.

11. Recognize relationship of accents to meter.

12. Identify and discriminate duple and triple meter including syncopation.

13. Identify chord changes, counter melodies, monody, homophony, and polyphony.

14. Identify introduction, interlude, cadence, and coda (simple forms AB, ABA, and Rondo).

15. Identify common musical terms related to tempo and dynamics.

16. Play an accompaniment.

17. Demonstrate elements of space, energy, and time through expressive movement.

18. Improvise and compose rhythmic phrases.

19. Identify, by listening, a basic repertoire of standard instrument and vocal compositions.

20. Identify the style of music of the period being studied in history through exposure to it.

21. Increasingly identify and appreciate timeless pieces of music and their composers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sixth Grade

*Objectives bearing an asterisk following the skill stated are reinforced in grades K-6 during Memory Time each year.

 

Math:

Students will:

1.   Increasingly demonstrate understanding that God gave us numbers and mathematical

       systems to help us in life and to also help us understand His immutable (unchangeable)

      and logical character.

2.   Complete all assigned math work/worksheets satisfactorily (75%+).

3.   Complete written story problems (using a variety of subjects) involving 1-4 steps.

4.   Solve at least 75% of all given addition, subtraction, multiplication (3 digits), division

      (two digits) problems using whole numbers and decimal numbers.

5.   Use math skills to correctly solve money problems.

6.   Apply math skills to other subject areas (e.g., Bible, history, etc.) as applicable.

7.   Correctly add and subtract three fractions with identical and different denominators.

8.   Correctly use operations on fractions.

9.   Identify reciprocals of fractions and make improper fractions.

10. Accurately estimate (round) numbers to solve and check problems.

11. Correctly reduce fractions to lowest terms, write decimals as fractions and write

       decimals as percentages, and fractions as percentages.

12. Correctly identify and calculate perimeter and area of basic geometric figures.

13. Correctly add, subtract, multiply and divide mixed numbers.

14. Correctly determine Greatest Common Factor (GFC) and Least Common Multiple (LCM)

       when given two numbers.

15. Correctly average whole numbers.

 

English/Grammar:

Students will:

1.   Correctly parse/classify a relatively complex sentence.

2.   Identify and use object complement noun/adjective.

3.   Recognize reflexive/intensive pronouns.

4.   Identify simple/perfect tenses, progressive/emphatic forms, active/passive voice for

      verbs.

5.   Identify and use adjective/adverb phrases.

6.   Identify and use verbals: gerunds, participles, and infinitives.

7.   Recognize independent and dependent (noun, adjective, and adverb) clauses.

8.   Apply the use of metaphors and similes in writing.

9.   Consistently solve word analogies.

10. Demonstrate correct use of grammar elements through proofing and editing his own

       and others' written work. Correct spelling errors.

11. Write five-part essay (in addition to further practice of writing exercises in prior years)

       using the above skills correctly. Describe and use introduction, body, and conclusion.

12. Take legible and accurate notes from a speaker's presentation.

13. Confidently use a dictionary, thesaurus, and other basic research materials.

14. Increase vocabulary through regular learning of definitions of unknown words in

       literature read in class.

15. Expand vocabulary by working with families of words from Greek and Latin roots.

16. Write several specific forms of poetry.

17. Write a teacher-directed term paper which includes bibliography(ies), footnote(s),

       outline(s), note cards, and other common elements of such a paper. It should be done

       with at least a rough draft and final draft before it is considered complete. It is

       understood that this is likely a first attempt at such a work product, and the student will

       be supervised as such with much help and teacher oversight.

 

Latin:

Students will:

1. Recognize and write Latin Vocabulary presented in Wheelock’s Latin.

2. Decline nouns

3. Conjugate verbs

4. Further their understanding of and participation in Latin conversation.

 

Reading/Literature:

Students will:

1.   Demonstrate an adequate improvement in his reading skills at a sixth grade level (or

       above) through written and oral comprehension exercises.

2.   Apply a satisfactory number of new vocabulary words to written and oral presentations.

3.   Gain understanding of the meaning of new words through the application of contextual

       clues, derivation of words found (and known) with Latin roots and frequent use of the

       dictionary.

4.   Correctly comprehend the literal and inferential meaning in a written work through

       group discussions and practicing contextual study.

5.   Evaluate characters and ideas in a limited way as to determine whether they are in line

      with basic biblical values and principles. This includes being able to determine whether

       a character is worthy of imitation by the student.

6.   Skim various readings with an appropriate level of comprehension.

7.   Identify the setting, characters, and basic plot of a given story or book.

8.   Demonstrate predictive skills through various activities, such as writing a brief sequel

       to the book or predicting what will happen in the next chapter/after the written story.

9.   Answer comprehension questions over independent and group reading.

10. Recall the qualities of the characters in stories and recognize those that are worth

            admiring, e.g., God-fearing, generous, kind, etc.

11. Express a worthwhile opinion for liking or disliking a particular book while

       differentiating fact from opinion.

12. Recognize and identify genres, e.g., comedy, drama, fantasy, fiction, legends, myths,

       mystery, non-fiction, poetry, by the style of the literature.

13. Identify setting, major and minor characters, introduction, conflict, climax, and

       resolution of a particular work.

14. Find the ISBN in a book and know its purpose.

15. Regularly participate in a schedule of oral reading and silent reading of literature.

16. Complete several kinds of oral presentations, e.g., drama, oral reading, etc., in front of

       the class, parent groups and other students as an audience.

17. Demonstrate a love of reading that manifests itself by showing interest in and ability to

       comprehend and enjoy books with increasing levels of difficulty and complexity.

18. Show an increased desire for reading and be able to identify favorite authors and titles.

 

Bible:

Students will:

1. Locate in his Bible the biblical events studied.

2. List the 32 events on the flashcards for series with applicable dates, and Scripture

    references in chronological order.

3. Recite the reasons given for the importance of significant dates or events covered in the

    study of Acts–Revelation.

4. Recall several basic facts related to each event studied.

5. Locate on a map of the world the key places where biblical events studied occurred.

6, Understand the events studied by reading them in Scripture.

7. Articulate the fact that God has sovereignly led through all of Scripture.

 

History/Geography:

Students will:

1. List the 32 events on the flashcards for Middle Ages, Renaissance & Reformation series

    with applicable dates in chronological order.

2. Recall several basic facts related to each event studied.

3. Locate on a map of the world the key places where historical events studied occurred.

4. Begin to describe the basic life-styles of people during this period of history, including

    dress, technology, vocations, religious practices, education, housing, and entertainment.

5. Sequence Flash Cards (including prior years) in chronological order and describe each

    historic event represented.

6. Study literature written from 400 AD to 1600 AD and answer basic comprehension

    questions as well as higher level questions including cause and effect relationships,

    inferring, drawing conclusions, compare and contrast, and making connections.

7. Discuss the history of the school and college, documenting important people and events,

     and describing examples of how God’s providence has guided, and continues to guide the

    school’s existence and development. (Miracle in the Ozarks)

 

 

 

Science:

Students will:

1.   Further understand the attributes of God’s world around them.

2.   Further understand that that all organisms, processes, laws, and elements found in

       scientific study were put into place by God.

3.   Name, define, and give examples of each state of matter.

4.   Define and describe properties, including size, color, shape, texture and weight.

5.   Define and explain solubility.

6.   Define and compare physical properties of solids, liquids and gases.

7.   List and define the properties of air.

8.   Define and explain simple, series, and parallel circuits and bulbs.

9.   Measure melting points and freezing points, and recite when example substances

       change states.

10. Define and give examples of solid and liquid conductors and insulators.

11. Explain the cause of magnetic attraction and temporary magnetism and explain their

       characteristics.

12. Describe and provide examples of magnetic fields.

13. Demonstrate how to build an electromagnet and explain what makes it work.

14. Illustrate the processes of a working motor.

15. Define buoyancy and magnetism.

16. Experiment with parachutes, hot air balloons, kites, airfoils, propeller planes, jet planes,

       helicopters and rockets to further explain attributes and properties of air, and wind,

       and flight.

17. Use a microscope to observe and draw conclusions.

 

 

Art:

Students will:

1.   Describe with good detail samples of variety in beauty, colors, textures, sizes, etc. found

       in the Creation that God gave to us.

2.   Correctly hold, use, clean-up, and store all tools and materials.

3.   Use the entire space given for creating work (i.e., fill the paper) with proper balance

      (negative and positive space, shapes).

4.   Use one-, two- and multiple-point perspectives in renderings and imaginative works.

5.   Render an outdoor landscape using correct perspective.

6.   Manipulate a variety (five to seven) of lights and darks (values) in color & B/W

      drawings and paintings.

7.   Identify and draw details of faces and bodies using proper proportions.

8.   Construct line drawings using a variety of line widths, implied textures, and shading

      (values).

9.   Draw or paint a given mammal or bird with correct proportions and using the above

      skills.

10. Copy from an illustration or photograph using the above skills and tools.

11. Suggest a given or selected mood in a work using the above skills.

12. Illustrate a story or theme using above skills and tools.

13. Given theme, create own illustration/sculpture using above skills.

14. Identify the fundamentals of aesthetic philosophy, paying particular attention to the

       definitions of the true, the good, and the beautiful.

15. Identify important artists and appreciate works of art concurrent with the historical

       period studied, paying particular attention to the fundamental mechanical aspects of

       the work itself as well as to the meaning conveyed by the artist through a given work

       and the historical context of both the work and its creator, e.g., realism and

        impressionism, post-impressionism and various modern art forms.

16. Integration with other subject areas (illustrate in Bible, history, literature, etc.)

 

Music:

Students will:

1.   Express that music is given by God and should be done to His glory.

2.   Sing increasingly more difficult songs including songs in Latin and Psalms.

3.   Demonstrate an understanding of the science of sound (musical acoustics).

4.   Distinguish between major and minor scales.

5.   Identify and recognize changes in meter by sight and sound.

6.   Identify from notation melody with accompaniment.

7.   Identify tonal and atonal composition, descants, and polyphonic, homophonic, and

      monophonic textures.

8.   Identify forms such as theme and variations, minuet, sonata-allegro.

9.   Identify changes in tempo, dynamics and timbre with appropriate musical terms.

10. Sing a varied repertoire of music written in three or more parts with age appropriate

      registrations.

11. Demonstrate basic level of instrumental proficiency.

12. Compare and notate music with harmonic accompaniment.

13. Describe stylistic characteristics of musical examples.

14. Respond appropriately with correct etiquette in a variety of concert situations (for

       performing in and attending concerts).

15. Begin to discuss and enjoy musical styles, idioms and forms of music from many

       historical periods, e.g., Baroque, Classical, Romantic, etc.

16. Identify the style of music of the period being studied in history (The Ancient World)

       through exposure to it.

17. Increasingly identify and appreciate timeless pieces of music and their composers.

 

 

This K-6 Grade Primary Objectives has been created as a supplement for bringing students up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord at the School of the Ozarks, Lab School of College of the Ozarks, Fall 2016.