Philosophy and Religion
2005 - 2006 College of the Ozarks Catalog

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science

As intellectual disciplines, philosophy and religion give attention to basic questions regarding reality, truth, meaning and values. The objectives for the major in philosophy and religion are: 1) to enable students to become familiar with the great philosophical traditions and representative thinkers of western civilization; 2) to enable students to develop the ability to reason well; 3) to enable students to have knowledge of the historical and literary dimensions of the Bible and its teachings; 4) to enable students to have the critical skills to interpret the Bible; 5) to enable students to understand and relate biblical teachings to contemporary society; 6) to enable students to understand the development of Christian history and other religious traditions.

Major in Philosophy and Religion
Required major courses: 37 hours
REL 103 Biblical Survey (F/S) 3
REL 253 New Testament (S) 3
REL 273 Old Testament (F) 3
REL 333 History of the Christian Church (F-O)  
or REL 213 Religions of Humanity (S-E) 3
REL 343 Biblical Theology & Ethics (F/S) 3
REL 461 Portfolio 1
PHI 203 Introduction to Philosophical Thought (F/S) 3
PHI 213 Logic and Language WI (S)  
PHI 303 Ethics WI (S-O) 3
or PHI 313 History of Philosophy (F-O) 3
REL/PHI additional courses 12
(In completing the major, students must take a minimum of 18 hours at the 300-400 level, and at least one course in Philosophy (PHI) in addition to those taken to fulfill the requirements listed above)
Required collateral courses: 3 hours  
PSY 103 Introduction to Psychology (F/S) 3
General Education course specified by the major:  
SOC 103 Introduction to Sociology (F/S) 3

Minor in Philosophy and Religion
Required minor courses: 21 hours  
REL 253 New Testament (S) 3
REL 273 Old Testament (F) 3
REL 343 Biblical Theology and Ethics (F/S) 3
PHI 203 Introduction to Philosophical Thought (F/S) 3
REL/PHI additional courses (minimum 6 hours 300-400 level) 9

Minor in Christian Ministry
Required of the Drama Ministry Emphasis  
Required minor courses: 21 hours  
PHI 203 Introduction to Philosophical Thought (F/S) 3
REL 253 New Testament (S) 3
REL 273 Old Testament (F) 3
REL 333 History of the Christian Church (F-O) 3
REL 343 Biblical Theology and Ethics (F/S) 3
REL 363 Christian Worship (S-E) 3
ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES 3
   REL 203 The Teaching of Jesus (F-O)  
   REL 303 The Prophets (S-O)  
   

COURSES IN PHILOSOPHY (PHI)

203 Introduction to Philosophical Thought This course serves as an introductory inquiry into the field of philosophy. Its nature, scope, methods and principal problems will be surveyed, and the student will be encouraged to critically evaluate contemporary culture through insights gained. (F/S)

213 Logic and Language An introductory study dealing with the principles of effective reasoning, including the use and abuse of language, the nature of definition, fallacies, rules of valid inference, syllogism and induction. Writing Intensive. (S)

223CC Medieval/Renaissance Ideals of Character (satisfies the Philosophy/Fine Arts requirement) Insofar as the medieval mind was dominated by the tenets of Christianity, this course begins with the examination of Christian worldviews constructed by such influential thinkers as Augustine, Boethius, Thomas Aquinas as well as the author of The Imitation of Christ, and then proceeding to medieval poets, especially Dante. The Renaissance segment focuses on the integration of, and the tension between, the sacred and the secular. Primary authors include Montaigne, Machiavelli, and Shakespeare.

 

Prerequisite for all 300-400 level courses: 45 hours or permission.

303 Ethics A study of the foundations of ethical ideals and moral judgments, ancient and modern, from both religious and secular perspectives. The historical and social contexts of ethical value systems are investigated, and some consideration is given to their contemporary relevance. Writing Intensive. (S–odd)

313 History of Philosophy A survey of the development of western philosophy from its origin with the ancient Greeks to the contribution of Renaissance and modern thinkers. (F–odd)

323 Philosophy of Religion An investigation of the philosophical nature of religion, its origins, practices, and meaning. The nature of religious language, the relation between reason and revelation, the nature of God and humanity, the quest for faith—these and other areas are considered in depth. (F–even)

403 Seminar in Philosophy This course will investigate a variety of philosophical trends, movements and themes, such as contemporary American philosophy, continental philosophy, existentialism and phenomenology, mysticism and logical positivism.

47V (1-6) Directed Readings A program of directed study for students majoring in philosophy and religion.

COURSES IN RELIGION (REL)

103 Biblical Survey A survey of the key themes of the Bible, with attention to the historical context, literary nature and theological meaning of the books which make up the Old and New Testaments. Required of all students. (F/S)

103C Biblical Ideals of Character (satisfies the Biblical Survey requirement) As the infallible word of God, the Bible is central to an understanding of character. While the thought of many non-biblical authors has had significant impact on American culture, the Bible remains the foundational text for understanding the origin of American ideas of character and morality. This course will explore the biblical foundations of character and significant contributions of authors who are/were within the context of a biblical-religious tradition.

203 The Teachings of Jesus A study of the life and teachings of Jesus as related to the world into which he came and as applied to the world today. (F–odd)

213 Religions of Humanity A consideration of the origins, historical development and essential beliefs of the major religions of the world, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Shintoism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. While this study is primarily descriptive in nature, some effort is made to compare the similarities and differences of these religions. (S–even)

253 New Testament—Prerequisite: REL 103. An in-depth introduction to the literature and theology of the New Testament with special emphasis on developing an informed process of biblical interpretation. (S)

273 Old Testament—Prerequisite: REL 103. An in-depth introduction to the literature and theology of the Old Testament with special emphasis on developing an informed process of biblical interpretation. (F)

Prerequisite for all 300-400 level courses: 45 hours or permission.

303 The Prophets A study of the rise of the prophetic movement in Israel with an emphasis on the message of the prophets and an evaluation of that message for the present day. (S–odd)

313 Old Testament Topics This course will focus on some aspect of Old Testament history, literature and/or theology, to be announced at the time of pre-registration. It may be repeated for credit, with permission, if a different subject is involved. Writing Intensive. (F-odd)

323 New Testament Topics This course will focus on some aspect of New Testament history, literature and/or theology, to be announced at the time of pre-registration. It may be repeated for credit, with permission, if a different subject is involved. Writing Intensive. (F-even)

333 History of the Christian Church A survey of the development of the Christian Church as a religious movement and as an institution from the days of the Apostles to the present time. Special emphasis is placed upon the Reformation and its later development in both Europe and the United States and on the distinctive features of American religious history. (F–odd)

343 Biblical Theology and Ethics—Prerequisite: 55 credit hours, including 103. This course will focus on three areas: learning a process of Biblical interpretation, examining the great teachings of the Bible and making an application of those teachings to behavior in a way that is ethically responsible. Required of all students. (F/S)

363 Christian Worship—A survey of the history and practice of worship, including its early Jewish roots in the Temple and Synagogue, traditions in Roman Catholicism and Protestantism, and later “free” traditions, including revivalism. (S–even)

413 Seminar in Biblically-Related Topics A course in a specialized area with particular attention given to research and methodology. Seminars have been offered on topics such as Biblical Archaeology, the Kingdom of God, Apocalyptic Literature and Galatians.

461 Portfolio—Prerequisite: permission. The student works with his/her advisor to prepare a collection of representative materials, i.e. tests, papers, projects, etc. done while in pursuit of the major in Philosophy/Religion.

47V (1-3) Directed Readings A program of directed study for students majoring in philosophy and religion, or minoring in religion.

48V (1-6) Internships Internships may be available for qualified students in a variety of academic and ministerial settings.

COURSES IN GREEK (GRK)

203 Grammar of the Greek New Testament I Introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of New Testament Greek. Drill in forms and syntax. (satisfies G.E. foreign language requirement)

213 Grammar of the Greek New Testament II A continuation of 203. Further study of the grammar and vocabulary of New Testament Greek with practice in translation from selected New Testament passages. Continued drill in forms and syntax. (satisfies G.E. foreign language requirement)

 

 

2005 - 2006 College of the Ozarks Catalog