Hotel and Restaurant Management
2005 - 2006 College of the Ozarks Catalog

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science

 

The Walter L. Green Chair of Hotel and Restaurant Management was established in 1993. Funds for the chair were provided by a bequest from Mr. Green.

The mission of the Hotel and Restaurant Management (HRM) program at College of the Ozarks is be the academic program of choice for those interested in either the hospitality industries as a career path or in graduate study in the hospitality disciplines.

To achieve this mission, the HRM program has the following goals: 1) to offer contemporary, multi-disciplined, and specialized courses of study, utilizing the unique learning laboratory environment of The Keeter Center and building on the general education curriculum of the College; 2) to integrate the five fundamental goals of the College (academic, vocational, spiritual, patriotic, and cultural) into the academic curriculum and activities of the HRM program; 3) to develop hospitality professionals who are self-directed, ethical and guest-focused, and who demonstrate competence in stewardship and creativity; 4) to develop life-long learners who are effective communicators, are globally aware, and fluent in the language and application of technology; 5) to be known and function as the regional center for the following:

     1. best practices in hospitality management, marketing, and operations
     2. best practices in workplace and foodservice safety
     3. culinary excellence

6) to be of service to the College and wider community through programs and activities which are developed, managed and performed by HRM students and faculty who exemplify “citizens of Christ-like character who are well-educated, hard-working, and patriotic.”

Major in Hotel/Restaurant Management
 
Required major courses: 34 hours
HRM 103 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry (F/S) 3
HRM 204 Lodging Operations (S) 4
HRM 303 Hospitality Marketing and Sales (F) 3
HRM 323 Tourism (S) 3
HRM 353 Managing Conventions and Group Business (F) 3
HRM 463 Hospitality Leadership and Supervision WI (S) 3
HRM 485 Hospitality Industry Internship 5
FCN 104 Introductory Food Study (F/S) 4
FCN 353 Quantity Foods (S) 3
FCN 373 Food Systems (F) 3
Required collateral courses: 19 hours
CSC 113 Fundamentals of Computer Systems (F/S) 3
FCN 201 Food Safety and Sanitation (F) 1
ACT 203 Elementary Accounting I (F/S) 3
MKT 223 Marketing (F/S) 3
BUS 233 Business Statistics (F/S) 3
BUS 313 Business Law I (F/S) 3
ONE OF THE FOLLOWING 3
   FCN 203 Contemporary Nutrition (S)  
   ACT 213 Elementary Accounting II (F/S)  
Recommended elective courses:  
HRM 343 Managing Hospitality Technology (S-E)  
HRM 363 International Hospitality Operations (S-O)  
HRM 413 Condominium and Vacation Ownership Management (F-E)  
HRM 453 Catering and Special Events Management (F-O)  

Professional Foodservice Management Emphasis

Required major courses: 35 hours
HRM 103 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry (F/S) 3
HRM 214 Principles of Professional Cooking I (S-E) 4
HRM 223 Restaurant Operations (F) 3
HRM 314 Principles of Professional Cooking II (F-E) 4
HRM 353 Managing Conventions and Group Business (F) 3
HRM 463 Hospitality Leadership and Supervision WI (S) 3
HRM 485 Hospitality Industry Internship 5
FCN 104 Introductory Food Study (F/S) 4
FCN 353 Quantity Foods (S) 3
FCN 373 Food Systems (F) 3
Required collateral courses: 18 hours
CSC 113 Fundamentals of Computer Systems (F/S) 3
FCN 201 Food Safety and Sanitation (F) 1
FCN 203 Contemporary Nutrition (S) 3
ACT 203 Elementary Accounting I (F/S) 3
BUS 233 Business Statistics (F/S) 3
BUS 313 Business Law (F/S) 3
FCN 471 Culinary Experience (taken twice) (S) 2
Recommended elective courses:  
HRM 343 Managing Hospitality Technology (S-E)  
HRM 414 Baking (S-O)  
HRM 453 Catering and Special Event Management (F-O)  

NOTE: Students majoring in Hotel & Restaurant Management will complete four (4) semesters in the college work program at a work station recommended by their HRM faculty advisor as appropriate to their major course of study. All work station assignments are made by the Dean of Work.


Minor in Hotel/Restaurant Management
 
Required minor courses: 20-21 hours
HRM 103 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry (F/S) 3
HRM 303 Hospitality Marketing and Sales (F) 3
FCN 104 Introductory Food Study (F) 4
FCN 373 Food Systems (F) 3
FCN 471 Culinary Experience (S) 1
ONE OF THE FOLLOWING 3-4
   HRM 204 Lodging Operations (S)  
   HRM 223 Restaurant Operations (F)  
The following courses may not be counted toward a major if they are to be used toward a minor.
ONE OF THE FOLLOWING 3
   HRM 323 Tourism (S)  
   HRM 343 Managing Hospitality Technology (S-E)  
   HRM 353 Managing Conventions and Group Business (F)  
   HRM 363 International Hospitality Operations (S-O)  
   FCN 303 Fundamentals of Human Nutrition (S)  
   FCN 353 Quantity Foods (S)  
   HRM 413 Condominium and Vacation Ownership Management (F-E)  
   HRM 453 Catering and Special Event Management (F-O)  

COURSES IN HOTEL/RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT (HRM)

103 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry This course provides the student with a comprehensive overview of all operating and staff departments within the hospitality industry. Particular attention is given to operation types, technological changes, history, present and future trends. (F/S)

204 Lodging Operations—Prerequisite: HRM 103 or permission. This course introduces the major concepts of rooms division management as practiced in the modern lodging environment. The course is organized around the concept of the guest cycle beginning with reservations and ending with guest departure. Major topics include front office operations and housekeeping with emphasis on planning and staffing. Guest and employee safety and security issues are examined. Laundry and maintenance topics are introduced. Contemporary guest service techniques are emphasized. Lecture three hours each week with laboratory two hours each week. (S)

214 Principles of Professional Cooking I—Prerequisite: HRM 103 and FCN 104 or permission. This course builds on the students understanding of basic food preparation principles. Students will be introduced to quality food production and the use of standard recipes as practices in professional environment through laboratory experience. Students examine the relationship between art and science in culinary preparation, the importance of food presentation, and expand their knowledge of kitchen management and terminology. The focus of this class is a culinary approach to food production for a restaurant or hotel setting. Two hours lecture and demonstration each week plus 4 hours of laboratory each week. (S-even)

223 Restaurant Operations—Prerequisite: HRM 103 or permission. This course examines the operation of the restaurant, either as a free standing enterprise or operating within a lodging environment. Students examine the business models of restaurants and are introduced to management concepts in design, planning, financing, purchasing and cost control. The course also emphasizes the service concept as applied in the contemporary restaurant setting. Students will practice various styles of table service and principles of dining room organization. Front of the house skills in reservations, reception and seating are introduced. Guest service principles are stressed. Two hours of classroom experience and two hours of laboratory each week. (F)

Prerequisite for all 300-400 level courses: 45 hours or permission.

303 Hospitality Marketing and Sales—Prerequisite: HRM 204 and MKT 223 or permission. This course builds on the student’s understanding of fundamental marketing concepts. Marketing communication, target markets for hospitality services, personal selling and sales management in a hotel environment, distribution, and strategic partnerships are examined. The marketing of hospitality services via the Internet are reviewed in depth. The concepts of personal selling and niche marketing are introduced. A group project is required. (F)

314 Principles of Professional Cooking II—Prerequisite: HRM 214 or permission. This course continues to build on the student’s understanding of food preparation principles. Students continue their exploration of quality food production, the use of standard recipes, food presentation, terminology and kitchen management. Special attention is given to meats, poultry, game, seafood, freshwater fish, sauces and the cold kitchen. Students have several opportunities to practice their skills in real-world environments. Two hours of classroom experience and four hours of laboratory each week. (F-even)

323 Tourism The student will examine the historical, social, psychological, cultural, international, economic and environmental dimensions of tourism. Emphasis will be placed on the tools and services available to assist the hospitality manager in managing and understanding tourism policies and procedures. (S)

343 Managing Hospitality Technology—Prerequisite: HRM 103 and CSC 113 or permission. This course introduces the application of computer and information systems within hospitality organizations. Emphasis is placed on specific industry applications including reservation management, rooms management, and accounting functions. Use of the Internet as a marketing and reservations tool will be examined in depth. In addition, a variety of stand-alone industry applications will be examined including point-of-sale systems, call accounting, and electronic locking systems. (S-even)

353 Managing Conventions and Group Business—Prerequisite: HRM 103 and HRM 204 or permission. This course provides a comprehensive examination of meeting planning from perspective of the professional meeting planner as well as the hotel-based convention services manager. Topics include a history of the convention, meetings and trade show industry, marketing and selling meeting services, characteristics of various meeting markets, event management, and food and beverage service. Particular attention is given to site selection, meeting specifications, and the service function. (F)

363 International Hospitality Operations—Prerequisite HRM 204 and HRM 323 or permission. This course examines the globalization of the tourism, travel, foodservice, and lodging industries with an emphasis on the emergence of the international hospitality chain. Students will investigate the political aspects of international operations and examine the issues involved in working with colleagues from other backgrounds and cultures. International hotel operations and marketing will be examined in depth. This course will be of special interest to students considering a career in international hospitality and business or an internship/study experience in a foreign country. (S-odd)

413 Condominium and Vacation Ownership Management—Prerequisites: HRM 103, HRM 204, and a major in HRM or permission. This course introduces the hospitality management aspects of the condominium resort and vacation ownership industry building on the students knowledge of traditional lodging operations. Students examine the history, legal, and business structure of the industry. Current trends are stressed. Operations topics such as housekeeping, accounting, engineering, reservations and front desk will be examined in the context of both whole and interval ownership properties. Industry marketing practices will be examined in depth. (F-even)

414 Baking—Prerequisite: HRM 314 or permission. This course builds on the student’s understanding of food production principles. It provides the student with a theoretical and practical foundation in baking practices as well as a hands-on laboratory experience in the professional kitchen. Topics include selection of ingredients, proper mixing and baking techniques, assembly, and imaginative decoration and presentation. While this course is primarily designed for those pursuing a professional foodservice career, students with a strong personal interest in fine cookery are welcome on a space available basis. (S-O)

453 Catering and Special Event Management—Prerequisite: HRM 353 or permission. This course builds on the major concepts of convention and group business management and the student’s understanding of the meeting industry. The course examines modern catering practices found in professional foodservice environments as well as the theory of event management, administration, and coordination. Students spend time planning and preparing appropriate menus for campus events. Discussion/lecture for two hours each week plus laboratory and kitchen assignments for two hours each week. (F-O)

463 Hospitality Leadership and Supervision—Prerequisite: HRM 103 and HRM 204 or permission. This course builds on the students knowledge of hospitality operations and management concepts while introducing specific employee leadership strategies including the development of purposes and goals, organization, motivation, communication, and evaluation using a case study approach. Topics include an examination of managerial and supervision theory and the application of these ideas in contemporary hospitality management settings. This course brings together hospitality management and operations knowledge gained from previous coursework and experiences. An individual research project and paper are required. Writing Intensive. (S)

48V (1-5) Hospitality Industry Internship—Prerequisite: permission. The purpose of this experience is to provide the student with a transition from classroom to industry. The student will secure an internship at an approved employment training station under a supervised working situation. The working situation will be consistent with the student’s career goals and program objectives. The internship provides the student the opportunity to experience full-time employment while simultaneously having the advantage of being monitored by a program instructor and/or coordinator.

49V (1-3) Special Problems—Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and permission. An opportunity for independent or semi-independent study in the area of Hotel and Restaurant Management.

 

2005 - 2006 College of the Ozarks Catalog