English
2005 - 2006 College of the Ozarks Catalog

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science

Students who complete a major in English can expect: 1) grounding in reading and critical interpretation of various genres of British, American and other Western literatures; 2) acquisition of rhetorical skills and language consciousness that encourage and develop clear, accurate, responsible and appropriate communication; 3) grounding in English grammar, linguistics and the history of the English language; 4) preparation for graduate study, teaching and other professions; 5) opportunities for the enhancement of creative talent and aesthetic sensibilities.

Students completing a double major in English/Secondary Education and requirements for state certification shall have: 1) a theoretical and practical knowledge of educational principles; 2) a broad knowledge of the English discipline, including practice in methodology and pedagogy; 3) a theoretical and applied knowledge appropriate to teaching in a multicultural, pluralistic society; 4) a thorough grounding in the responsibilities which teaching professionals have toward their students, school and community.

Major in English
Required major courses: 37 hours  
ENG 203 Foundations of Literary Studies WI (F) 3
ENG 223 Introduction to Grammar (F) 3
ENG 401 Portfolio (F/S) 1
ENG 423 History of the English Language (S) 3
ENB 203 Survey of British Literature I (F) 3
ENB 213 Survey of British Literature II (S) 3
ENA 203 Survey of American Literature I (S) 3
ENA 213 Survey of American Literature II (F) 3
ENW 303 Western Literature I WI (S) 3
Additional literature courses (300-400 level) 9
ONE OF THE FOLLOWING 3
   ENG 323 Creative Writing: Non-Fiction (S)  
   ENG 343 Creative Writing: Poetry (F)  
   ENG 353 Creative Writing: Fiction (S)  
Note: Recommended for all majors: ENG 433 Literary Criticism, especially for those going on to graduate studies in English; additional foreign language courses; and upper-division history courses.

Double Major
English/Secondary Education
Students may become certified to teach English by double majoring in English and Secondary Education. Students taking an English/Secondary Education double major must take the following as part of the Secondary Education major:
EED 322 Multicultural and Adolescent Literature (S) 2
EED 423 Teaching Composition (F-O) 3
EED 433 Methods of Teaching English (F-E) 3

Minor in Literature
Required minor courses: 21 hours  
ENG 203 Foundations of Literary Studies WI (F) 3
ENB 203 Survey of British Literature I (F) 3
ENB 213 Survey of British Literature II (S) 3
ENW 303 Western Literature I (S) 3
Two courses in American Literature (300-400 level) 6
One course in British Literature (300-400 level) 3

Minor in Rhetoric
Required minor courses: 18 hours  
ENG 223 Introduction to Grammar (F) 3
ENG 323 Creative Writing: Non-Fiction (S) 3
ENG 343 Creative Writing: Poetry (F) 3
ENG 353 Creative Writing: Fiction (S) 3
ENG 423 History of the English Language (S) 3
ONE OF THE FOLLOWING 3
   ENG 333 Technical Writing WI (F/S)  
   ENG 49V (1-6) Special Problems EED 423 Teaching Composition (S)  
   ENG 21V Peer Writing Assistant Seminar (F/S) MJR 343 Feature Writing (F)  

COURSES IN COMPOSITION, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE (ENG)

103 College Composition I Through a series of writing experiences, students explore writing as both a process of discovering and deepening ideas and the product or record of those ideas. The central aims of the course are to teach prewriting techniques; collaborative learning skills; critical thinking skills; and revision strategies which include using the conventions of standard, edited English in formal writing. Writing Intensive. (F/S)

201 Practicum in Publication of Student Writing The publication of the Gordian Knot, an anthology of creative writing, art, and photography, provides the material and experience for student editors who will edit, proof­read, evaluate material, assemble the copy and evaluate published editions. May be repeated three times. (F/S)

203 Foundations of Literary Studies Students majoring or minoring in English will engage in close reading of selected works of literature, gaining interpretive skills and a working critical vocabulary to facilitate their studies in English. Primary emphasis will be placed on writing critical essays using New Critical and Formalist interpretative strategies, with some exposure to newer theoretical approaches. Writing Intensive. (F)

21V Peer Writing Assistant Seminar The primary goal of this course is to teach students to be effective respondents to the thinking and writing of others. Students keep journals, write analytical papers, explore writing across the disciplines, observe and practice peer tutoring, and critique professional literature related to tutoring writing. Normally a two-credit course but can be designed as a three-credit course for the rhetoric minor. Required for student writing assistants working in the Center for Writing and Thinking. (F/S)

223 Introduction to Grammar A study of the grammar of the written dialect of American English. This course attempts to explore fundamental structures of traditional, structural and transformational grammars applicable to analysis and prescriptive practices appropriate for informal and formal levels of written American English. (F)

Prerequisite for all 300-400 level courses: 45 hours or permission.

303 College Composition II—Prerequisite: 55 credit hours. A required composition course emphasizing argumentation which provides an opportunity for students to utilize their composition skills, research techniques and academic interests in the development of mature, academic compositions. Writing Intensive. (F/S)

303WC Reformation/Modern Ideals of Character—Prerequisite: 55 credit hours (satisfies the College Composition II requirement). Luther’s understanding of salvation by faith alone holds enormous implications for the study of Scripture and for the application of Biblical principles to individual choices regarding right and wrong. This course will examine the effects of the Reformation on our understanding of character and explore how those effects were modified and to a degree subverted by the newer ideals of the Enlightenment and Modern eras. Writing Intensive. (F/S)

323 Creative Writing: Non-fiction Designed to enhance the rhetorical style and skill of the already competent writer through the study of creative non-fiction. A close examination of the nature and uses of language will reveal the variety and appropriateness of purpose in non-fiction texts with regard to specific discourse communities. Emphasis will be placed on developing creativity of expression through critical reading and imitation of various forms in the genre, which may include popular and professional articles, critical reviews, personal essays, and descriptive and narrative non-fiction. (S)

333 Technical Writing—Prerequisite: ENG 303. Designed to introduce students in various fields to formal report writing as practiced in industry, government and the professions. Writing Intensive. (F/S)

343 Creative Writing: Poetry Initial study of the principles of poetry and great poems of the past and present leading to students writing their own poems. Class discussion and revision of student poems will be emphasized. (F)

353 Creative Writing: Fiction Some reading and analysis of published short fiction will lead to writing, group evaluation and revision of student fiction. (S)

363 Film as Literature A course focused on the study of films as fully-func-tioning literary texts. Students will view and closely read selected visual “texts,” focusing on the elements of literary analysis and established theories of literary criticism. Such analysis is designed to encourage the students’ critical viewing of popular movies. (S-odd)

401 Portfolio—Prerequisites: 30 hours of English credits. Required for senior English majors, the course is an independent study designed for finalizing the student’s professional development file. In addition to completing portfolio requirements, students will write a reflective essay analyzing the artifacts they have assembled and evaluating the strength of their program of study as evidenced in their professional development file. Students will also be required to take the ETS Major Field Exam in English. Offered on a Pass/Fail basis. (F/S)

423 History of the English Language—Prerequisite: ENG 223. Systematic study of the structure and growth of the English language from the earliest period to modern times. (S)

433 Literary Criticism Considers historical and contemporary critical approaches to literature. Practical application of theory to literary texts is emphasized. This course is strongly recommended to all English majors. (F–even)

443 Seminar A course tailored to the needs and interests of students focusing on readings in literature or special problems. (F–even)

47V (1-6) Directed Readings Enables individual students to pursue specific authors, genres, literary periods, limited areas of linguistics or other subjects that supplement or fulfill needs not satisfied by the present curriculum. Directed Readings also provides the student the opportunity to penetrate substantive reading material independently and will contribute to the acquisition of scholarship. A student who desires to participate in Directed Readings will, in advance of registration, submit a complete description of the reading which he or she desires to pursue and a tentative bibliography to the English faculty member of his or her choice and the divisional chair for approval.

48V (1-6) Internship Internships are available for qualified students who wish to pursue off-campus learning experiences.

49V (1-6) Special Problems Tailored courses are offered to accommodate specific interests of students and/or faculty. They may include topics in an author, literary genre, an interdisciplinary perspective or other appropriate topics. Special Topics may not be used to fulfill specified upper-division course requirements listed above under “Major in English,” “Minor in Literature,” or “Minor in Rhetoric.”

COURSES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (ENA)

123 Topics in American Literature Through close reading and guided interpretation of significant works of American literature, students will study important themes and various literary forms that give shape and texture to American culture. (F/S)

203 Survey of American Literature I A study of significant works in American Literature from the Colonial period to American Romanticism. (S)

213 Survey of American Literature II A study of significant works in American Literature from Romanticism to the Contemporary. (F)

Prerequisite for all 300-400 level courses: 45 hours or permission.

323 The American Novel Surveys the development of the novel from the post­revolutionary period to the present, and includes such writers as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Dreiser, Hemingway and Vonnegut. (S–even)

403 American Literature in the Nineteenth Century A course primarily for English majors and minors which concentrates on selected major authors, literary movements and philosophical thought in nineteenth-century America. (F)

413 American Literature in the Twentieth Century A course primarily for English majors and minors which concentrates on selected major authors, literary movements or genres in the modernist and contemporary periods. (S)

COURSES IN BRITISH LITERATURE (ENB)

203 Survey of British Literature I A study of the significant works in British literary history from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Age of Romanticism. (F)

213 Survey of British Literature II A continuation of 203 from the first British Romantic writers to the present. (S)

Prerequisite for all 300-400 level courses: 45 hours or permission.

303 Anglo-Saxon to Restoration An in-depth study of selected masters of prose and poetry from this historical period (450 to 1660). (F–even) 313 Restoration and Eighteenth Century A study of British literature from 1660 to the beginning of Romanticism, including such writers as Dryden, Swift, Pope, Fielding and Johnson. (S–odd)

323 Romantic and Victorian Literature A study of the principal literary influences in nineteenth-century British literature, including Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Browning, Tennyson and other major writers. (F–odd)

343 British Novel A study of selected novels from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, focusing on ways fiction reflects and challenges values, attitudes, and responses of the day. (S–odd)

403 Shakespeare's Tragedies A study of selected tragedies. (F–even)

423 Shakespeare’s Comedies and Histories A study of selected comedies and history plays. (F–odd)

433 British Literature in the Twentieth Century A course primarily for English majors and minors which concentrates on selected major authors, literary movements, or genres in the modernist and contemporary periods. (S–even)

COURSES IN WORLD LITERATURE (ENW)

133 Topics in Western World Literature Through close reading and guided interpretation of significant works of Western World literature, students will study important themes and various literary forms that give shape and texture to Western civilizations. (F/S)

133CC Classical Ideals of Character (satisfies the General Education Literature requirement) Aside from the Bible, Greek and Roman thinkers and writers have had the greatest influence on our understanding of virtue and ethical practice; consequently, this course is essential to any serious study of character. Sustained and in-depth attention will be given to Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Aristotle’s Ethics, and Plato’s Gorgias. Further, Cicero’s understanding of natural law and moral virtue will be explored through excerpts from his On Duties.

Prerequisite for all 300-400 level courses: 45 hours or permission.

303 Western Literature I A study of the classical literary works of the Greeks, Romans and Medieval writers who were most influential in the development of Western literature, thought and art. Writing Intensive. (S)

333 Western Literature II A study of the works and ideas of major writers who have influenced the shaping of the modern world. The course covers literature of Europe and the Americas since the Renaissance. (F)

COURSES IN ENGLISH EDUCATION (EED)

322 Multicultural and Adolescent Literature—Prerequisite: acceptance in teacher education program or permission. The students will study adolescent interests, reading habits, needs, experiences and materials in preparation for teaching in middle and secondary schools. Careful consideration will be given to the literature of the adolescent reader and multicultural values embodied in the material. (S)

423 Teaching Composition—Prerequisite: ENG 303 and acceptance in the teacher education program. This course focuses on theories and methods of teaching rhetoric and composition, with an emphasis on a developmental approach to writing ability. Requirements include lab experiences, unit and curriculum planning, and uses of computers in the composition classrooms. (F-odd)

433 Methods of Teaching English—Prerequisite: EDU 393 and acceptance in the teacher education program. A study of the techniques of teaching literature, composition and grammar with emphasis on the development of materials and units of study. Laboratory teaching and curriculum planning of four major units are required. (F-even)


2005 - 2006 College of the Ozarks Catalog